makeup

FacePaint The Story of Makeup

A deep look into the history of make-up since its very first origin until today, written by the famous and fabulous make-up artist Lisa Eldridge.

You shouldn’t be expecting a step by step make-up guide, like her worldwide appreciated and super visited blog, but a fascinating history of make-up throughout the centuries: the ancient ingredients, the first, harmful, beauty treatments and experimentations and a very interesting analyses of the reasons and factors which might have led our ancestors towards make-up.

A wonderful gift for everyone curious about the provenance of most of the products populating women’s cosmetic beauty bag today. FacePaint contains sophisticated illustrations, vintage covers, extraordinary photos of make-up muses and iconic women and, last but not least, memorable advertisements of some of the brands that shaped the history of make-up.

credit: http://www.lisaeldridge.com/facepaint/

Selling Performances

Coco Chanel once said “If you’re sad, add more lipstick and attack”
(But pls, put on the right tone!) :)

Make up… Let’s face it. Today we’re literally obsessed with it. We can’t give up make up, can we?

Either a simple mascara, a perfect foundation (still looking!) or a simple touch of lipstick, whatever to make us gorgeous. I would like to share with you something happened to me a couple of weeks ago, in a beauty store. I was looking for the concealer; I already knew the brand I wanted, I went straight to the beauty consultant and asked for it. After explaining the “why” behind my decision (seriously?) she started the selling performance: my skin, she claimed, looks “completely dehydrated, old (?), tired and grey, especially under the eyes” (no matter what biological supernatural product I was using!) *.

“Shortly”, she went on, “my complexion will be ruined, completely” (?), unless (guess what?) I buy (…)” one or more of the miraculous and extra extra pricey products she was recommending.

*For the record: my skin has always been fully hydrated, particularly the under eyes area, which, actually is a little greasy*

Anyway, giving money to someone behaving like that, can you imagine?

Yes, I can. And, unfortunately, in the past, I did.

When I was in my twenties, I easily fell in this trap: that’s a classic method of persuasion which makes leverage on our weaknesses and lack of self-confidence just to force us buying new products.

Today, whenever I assist this “performance”, I politely listen to consultants, faking attention and smile (come on, it reduces the wrinkles) and as soon as they finish, I simply say thanks for their precious suggestions and go away.

Here is the thing: let’s always trust our personal judgement; or, at least, give it a try :)